Photo: WHMP

The Easthampton mayoral candidates debated Tuesday night at the Eastworks Building, hosted by the Greater Easthampton Chamber of Commerce.  Questions were posed about the future of route ten, the role of grants in the city budget, and the relationship between the mayors office ahd the business community. Each candidate talked about their unique qualifications for office. David Ewing alluded to his corporate management skills but did not elaborate or give specifics. He also referred to his “master plan on paper” and said anyone is welcome to have a copy. Herbert Glazier said he had business experience.  Nancy Sykes said she’s the only qualified candidate.   She said she was the only one with leadership and management skills. She pointed to her time as former Dean of Students at Western New England College. Karen Cadieux said she’s uniquely qualified because of her years serving as Mayor Tautznik’s assistant.  She said she knows the job because she’s lived it.  All four names will be on the November 5 ballot because the Easthampton charter has no provision for preliminary elections.

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