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Peaceful Vigil for Trayvon Martin in Springfield

Trayvon Martin vigil in Springfield Photo: WHMP/Mary Serreze

Peaceful Vigil for Trayvon Martin in Springfield

Last night 200 people lit candles to honor slain black teenager Trayvon Martin as night fell on Court Square in Springfield. The event was sponsored by the Springfield NAACP and a coalition of community groups. State Reps Ben Swan and Cheryl Coakley-Rivera invoked the name of God and asked those gathered to draw upon their faith. But both said it’s essential for black people to organize and become politically active. Ida Flynn of the Springfield NAACP said she believes Trayvon Martin was murdered, but that the best tactic is to remain calm and peaceful. She encouraged people to go on line and sign the national NAACP petition calling on the Justice Department to file criminal civil rights charges against George Zimmerman. 17-year-old Kahari Mickens read a poem in which he identified with Martin, who’s his own age. Organizers gave the mic to Shirley Amakel, an elderly woman who wanted to speak.  She said Martin was killed because he is black. The Reverend Al Sharpton has asked for a nationwide observance Saturday morning at ten am.  A second rally is planned in front of the Springfield federal building at that time.

 

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