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Bob Dylan appears in Super Bowl ad; music in 2

Bob Dylan appears in Super Bowl ad; music in 2

PITCHMAN: Bob Dylan says "We will build your car" in a new ad for Chrysler. Photo: YouTube

Sometimes it’s hard to tell what Bob Dylan is saying when he was singing. But during his TV pitch last night on the Super Bowl, the message came through clearly: buy American cars.

The music legend appeared in a two-minute ad for Chrysler.

And like many of the automaker’s commercials in recent Super Bowls, it played up the fact that the cars are American-made by Americans.

In the ad, Dylan walks through the streets of Detroit, explaining that the now-bankrupt city made cars and that in turn, “cars made America.”

The ad closes with Dylan’s raspy voice intoning: “Let Germany brew your beer, let Switzerland make your watch, let Asia assemble your phone. We will build your car.”

It was the second of two Super Bowl ads featuring Dylan. The song “I Want You” was featured in the Chobani ad — where a hungry bear rampages through a convenience store to score a cup of the honey-flavored version of the popular Greek-style yogurt.

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