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David Beckham wants his son on Miami soccer team

David Beckham wants his son on Miami soccer team

SOCCER SON: David Beckham's 14-year-old son Brooklyn has already undergone a trial with his father's former team Manchester United, and now reports suggest Beckham is planing to use his MSL venture to launch the youngster's career. Photo: Reuters

David Beckham reportedly wants to sign his budding soccer player son Brooklyn to his new Miami team once it is up and running.

Beckham announced earlier this month that he will be returning to the U.S. soccer scene by creating his own Major League Soccer (MLS) team in Miami, Florida with his business partner Simon Fuller.

His 14-year-old son Brooklyn has already undergone a trial with his father’s former team Manchester United, and now reports suggest Beckham is planing to use his MSL venture to launch the youngster’s career.

A source tells Britain’s Daily Star newspaper, “The Beckham family see their future in the U.S. at the moment. As a result, it makes sense for Brooklyn to play for his dad’s team.

“At first, he had reservations because people might think he’d get an easy ride. But it would be a dream come true for him to play with his dad by his side. They’re working together towards making it happen.”

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