News

Dolphins’ Pouncey subpoenaed in Hernandez murder probe

Dolphins’ Pouncey subpoenaed in Hernandez murder probe

SUBPOENAED: MIke Pouncey is being called to testify before a Grand Jury. Photo: Associated Press

BOSTON (Reuters) – A Miami Dolphins player on Sunday received a grand jury subpoena linked to an investigation into former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez, who has been accused of murdering an associate, Sports Illustrated reported.

Massachusetts State Police handed the legal papers to the player, center Mike Pouncey, at the Patriots’ stadium in Foxboro after the two teams faced each other on the field, the magazine reported on its website.

Sports Illustrated quoted an unidentified source as saying the grand jury was probing whether Hernandez was involved in interstate gun trafficking.

The report said that as Pouncey received the papers, a police official told the player: “It’s about a grand-jury investigation … Make sure you arrive.”

Hernandez and Pouncey are friends who both attended the University of Florida, Sports Illustrated said.

A Massachusetts State Police spokesman declined on Monday to comment on the report, referring questions to the Bristol County District Attorney’s office. A spokesman for the district attorney, who is handling the murder prosecution against Hernandez, did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

Hernandez has been charged with the June 17 killing of his friend Odin Lloyd, a semiprofessional football player. He has pleaded not guilty to a first-degree murder charge and several charges of possessing illegal firearms in connection with the crime at an industrial park near his North Attleborough, Massachusetts home.

Hernandez was dropped by the Patriots the day he was arrested in June.

Grand juries are convened during criminal investigations to hear testimony from witnesses and to determine if formal criminal trials are warranted. Being called to testify before a grand jury panel is not an indication that the person is suspected of criminal activity.

Miami Dolphins officials, who declined to comment to Sports Illustrated, did not respond to a call seeking comment on Monday.

Recent Headlines

in National

Amanda Knox murder conviction overturned

FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2014, file photo, Amanda Knox prepares to leave the set following a television interview in New York. Knox is engaged to Colin Sutherland, a musician who recently moved to Seattle from New York, a person close to the Knox family confirmed for The Associated Press. Knox’s murder conviction in the 2007 stabbing of her roommate has been reinstated by an Italian court, but the former college exchange student maintains her innocence and vows she won’t willingly go back to Italy. Both Knox and Sutherland are 27. No wedding date had been set.

Italy's highest court has overturned the murder conviction against Amanda Knox, bringing to a definitive end the high-profile case.

in National

Time for Iran to make tough decisions in nuclear talks

In this March 26, 2015, photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, leaves a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other U.S. officials at a hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland. U.S. and Iranian diplomats gather at a Baroque palace in Europe, a historic nuclear agreement within reach. Over Iraq’s deserts, their militaries fight a common foe. Leaders in Washington and Tehran, capitals once a million miles from each other in ideological terms, wrestle for the first time in decades with the notion of a rapprochement.

Six world powers and Iran move closer to a deal, but there are still major disagreements.

in National

Making headlines this week

AP193442892434_0

A look at some of the week's biggest headlines and the stories you may have missed.

in Entertainment, National

Celebrities protest new Indiana law

George Takei poses for a portrait at Quaker Good Energy Lodge with GenArt and the Collective , during the Sundance Film Festival, on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014 in Park City, Utah.

Celebrities call for an Indiana boycott after the passing of a controversial law that could lead to discrimination against gay couples.

in National

Senate’s Harry Reid will not seek re-election

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. adjusts his glasses as he speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 24, 2015, following a policy luncheon. Reid is wearing special glasses as part of his recovery from injuries suffered in an exercise accident in January.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid says that it would be "inappropriate" for him to seek re-election.