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George Jones’ Nashville monument unveiled

George Jones’ Nashville monument unveiled

GEORGE JONES REMEMBERED: Nancy Jones, the widow of country music star George Jones, center, poses with singers Joe Diffie, right, and Jett Williams, left, at the memorial to the late singer dedicated on Monday, Nov. 18, in Nashville, Tenn. Photo: Associated Press/Mark Humphrey

monument
Nancy Jones spoke at the monument’s dedication and announced a scholarship in her late husband’s name at Middle Tennessee State University. George Jones died April 26. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — George Jones was a different kind of singer.

And fans of the late country star will get a different kind of look when they go visit his memorial in Nashville, Tennessee.

The monument features a large arch with the words “He Stopped Loving Her Today” inscribed under his name.

That, of course, is the title of his best known hit.

The monument also features images of Jones and his widow Nancy, a guitar and his nickname, “The Possum.”

At the monument’s unveiling, Nancy Jones announced a scholarship in her husband’s honor.

On either side of the grave there are benches for his fans to sit and look the memorial.

Jones died in April at the age of 81.

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