Harrison Ford’s injury could impact ‘Star Wars’ filming

Harrison Ford’s injury could impact ‘Star Wars’ filming

HARRISON FORD:The actor was airlifted to a hospital in Oxford, England after breaking his ankle on the set of the new "Star Wars" movie. Photo: Associated Press

Harrison Ford’s son fears the movie star will need a plate and screws fixed in his ankle after his accident on the “Star Wars: Episode VII” set last week.

The actor was airlifted to a hospital in Oxford, England after breaking his ankle.

Reports suggested Ford was crushed by the Millennium Falcon – the spaceship his character Han Solo pilots in the film.

Now, as his wife Calista Flockhart arrives in the U.K. to be by her husband’s side as he recovers, his chef son Ben tells “Access Hollywood” that the 71-year-old could be sidelined for weeks.

According to show insiders, Ben Ford told “Access” that the “Star Wars” sequel crew may have to shoot the remainder of his dad’s scenes from the waist up in order to stay on schedule. “Star Wars” bosses insist filming on “Episode VII” will not be affected by Ford’s injury.

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