‘Heartbreak’ leads to Paul Simon’s 911 call, arrest

‘Heartbreak’ leads to Paul Simon’s 911 call, arrest

DISORDERLY CONDUCT: Singer Paul Simon, left, and his wife Edie Brickell appear at a hearing in Norwalk Superior Court on Monday April 28, in Norwalk, Conn. Photo: Associated Press/The Hour, Alex von Kleydorff

NORWALK, Conn. (AP) — A police report shows Paul Simon made the 911 call that led to the weekend arrests of him and his wife, Edie Brickell, on disorderly conduct charges.

Two police reports, first obtained by The Hour of Norwalk, indicate that Brickell slapped Simon at their New Canaan, Connecticut, home on Saturday. She told officers he had done something to “break her heart.”

The reports indicate Simon suffered a superficial cut to his ear, and Brickell, who smelled of alcohol, had a bruise on her wrist.

Both said in court Monday they didn’t consider the other a threat, and no protective order was issued. They are due back in court on May 16.

A song by the pair “Like To Get To Know You” was posted Wednesday on Brickell’s website.

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