Today in entertainment history: Nov. 7

Today in entertainment history: Nov. 7

HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Lorde will celebrate her 18th birthday today. Photo: Associated Press

1951: Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner were married. She filed for divorce in 1954.

1968: The Doors were banned in Phoenix after Jim Morrison told the audience to stand up. Police were wary of Morrison’s intentions because he had recently mooned an audience.

2006: Britney Spears filed for divorce from Kevin Federline. They had been married for just over two years, and she had given birth to their second son just two months earlier.

2011: Dr. Conrad Murray was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson in 2009.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Barry Newman is 76. Singer Johnny Rivers is 72. Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 71. Actor Christopher Knight (“The Brady Bunch”) is 57. Guitarist Greg Tribbett of Mudvayne is 46. Actor Jeremy London (“Party of Five”) is 42. Actor Jason London (“The Rage: Carrie Two”) is 42. Actress Yunjin Kim (“Lost”) is 41. Guitarist Zach Myers of Shinedown is 31. Actor Lucas Neff (“Raising Hope”) is 29. Rapper Tinie Tempah is 26. Singer Lorde is 18.

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