‘Breaking Bad’ star to play Lex Luthor

‘Breaking Bad’ star to play Lex Luthor

Bryan Cranston will play Superman's arch nemesis, Lex Luthor in the next Man of Steel film Photo: WENN/Brian To

Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston has been cast as Lex Luthor in the Man of Steel sequel, according to reports.

The actor has reportedly signed a deal that will tie him to 10 films as Superman’s arch-nemesis, according to Cosmic Book News.

A source says, “Cranston truly is a dream casting for Luthor.”

Executives at Warner Bros. are reportedly looking to make the casting announcement after the series finale of Cranston’s hit TV drama Breaking Bad.

Cranston was easy to cast – he urged the producers of the next Superman movie to consider him for the role.

Earlier this year, he told, “Give me a call. I like Lex Luthor. I think he’s misunderstood. He’s a lovable, sweet man.”

Cranston insisted he is already well prepared to play the hairless villain as he has been shaving his head for several years for his role as cancer-stricken teacher-turned-drug dealer Walter White in Breaking Bad.

Luthor has previously been played on the big screen by Gene Hackman and Kevin Spacey.

On Friday, it was announced Ben Affleck will be playing Batman in the Man of Steel follow-up. British actor Henry Cavill will reprise his role as Superman.

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