Fan grabs 4 foul balls at Indians game

Fan grabs 4 foul balls at Indians game

Cleveland Indians relief pitcher C.C. Lee delivers in the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Sunday, July 14, 2013, in Cleveland. The Indians won 6-4. Photo: Associated Press/Tony Dejak

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Cleveland Indians say a lucky fan at Sunday’s game caught four foul balls, a once-in-several-lifetimes achievement.

The team said Greg Van Niel, a season-ticket holder, hauled in four souvenir balls during the Indians’ 6-4 win over the Kansas City Royals. Van Niel said he wasn’t sitting in his usual seats, but he was able to catch three balls and that one was a “pick-up” he tossed to another fan. Van Niel said he planned to give the three other balls to kids that were part of his group.

Van Niel posed for a picture holding three of the souvenirs for the Indians. He said he had never caught a foul ball before his amazing one-day haul.

There were 15,431 other fans at the Indians’ final game before the All-Star break, but it’s safe to bet none had a day quite like Van Niel.

Recent Headlines

in National

Trump drops 12 points in poll: Reuters/Ipsos


Donald Trump's support among Republicans has dropped 12 points in less than a week according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll.

in National

Police name suspect in Colorado Springs shooting


Police on Saturday identified the suspect in a deadly shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic.

in Black Friday, Lifestyle, National

Black Friday crowds thin in subdued start to holiday shopping


America's annual Black Friday shopping extravaganza was short on fireworks this year.

in National

Making headlines this week

Santa Claus participates in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015, in New York. (Photo by Scott Roth/Invision/AP)

A look at some of this week's biggest newsmakers and the headlines you may have missed.

in National

Smartphones may have role in rise of U.S. traffic deaths


The number of deaths from traffic accidents jumped 8.1 percent in the first half of 2015, suggesting smartphones and other driving distractions could be making America's roadways more dangerous.