News

Jay Z, Beyonce tried to trademark daughter’s name

Jay Z, Beyonce tried to trademark daughter’s name

WHAT'S IN A NAME: Jay Z and Beyonce wanted to trademark the name of their daughter, Blue Ivy. Photo: Associated Press

Superstars Jay z and Beyonce wanted to trademark their daughter Blue Ivy’s name.

The couple say they were simply trying to protect others from cashing in on her unique moniker.

The “Crazy In Love” hitmaker gave birth to the couple’s first child in January 2012, and the new parents subsequently filed legal papers in a bid to protect the rights to their baby’s name amid rumors they were planning to launch products in their daughter’s honor.

However, their request was rejected after it was discovered that bosses at party planning firm Blue Ivy Events in Boston, Massachusetts had been operating under the title since 2009.

Now Jay Z has opened up about their failed trademark effort in a new cover story for Vanity Fair magazine, insisting they never actually planned to do anything with the copyright.

He says, “People wanted to make products based on our child’s name and you don’t want anybody trying to benefit off your baby’s name. It wasn’t for us to do anything; as you see, we haven’t done anything.”

Recent Headlines

in National

As gas prices drop, Americans favor oil exports

Fresh
gas

A new poll shows Americans are more likely than ever to favor easing a ban on exporting crude oil.

in Trending, Viral Videos

TODAY’S MUST SEE: Teacher’s ‘Uptown Funk’ dance gets an A+

Updated
21-overlay2

A theater teacher at a Dallas high school proves he - and his students - have got some serious moves.

in National

Feds say Obamacare could affect nearly a third of taxpayers

tax

Up to four percent of Americans are expected to pay a penalty for failing to obtain health coverage last year.

in National

Obama budget proposes spending lift for military, domestic programs

obama

The fiscal 2016 budget, which the White House intends to unveil on Monday, would fund a host of programs that Republicans are unlikely to support.

in National

1 in 5 U.S. children rely on food stamps

foodstamps

The number of children relying on food stamps spiked to 16 million last year, signaling a lopsided economic recovery.