LISTEN: Lana Del Rey trashes Lady Gaga in leaked song

LISTEN: Lana Del Rey trashes Lady Gaga in leaked song

Lana Del Rey has criticized Lady Gaga in a new song leaked on the Internet. Listen! Photo: Associated Press

Lana Del Rey has criticized pop peer Lady Gaga in a new song leaked onto the Internet on Tuesday.

In the track, called “So Legit,” the “Video Game” performer verbally attacks the “Born This Way” hitmaker, real name Stefani Germanotta, making fun of her looks and her voice.

She sings, “Stefani, you suck/I know you’re selling 20 million/Wish they could have seen you when we booed you off in Williamsburg.”

The track dates back to 2008, when Gaga’s debut album, “The Fame,” became a huge hit around the world.

Del Rey also sings, “What happened to Brooklyn, what happened to our scene, baby?/Have we all gone Gaga crazy?/Remember when the streets used to be dangerous and we were born bad?”

The singers were previously believed to be close friends. Neither has commented on the song or its lyrics, and it is not clear what happened in Williamsburg that prompted fans to boo the “Paparazzi” hitmaker.

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