Man of Steel sequel to film in cash-strapped Detroit

Man of Steel sequel to film in cash-strapped Detroit

Henry Cavill stars in 'Man of Steel' Photo: WENN/

Superman is coming to the aid of the cash-strapped citizens Detroit – a large portion of Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel sequel will be filmed in the city thanks to a large filming break.

Officials at the Michigan Film Office have announced director Snyder and his producers have been awarded an incentive of $35 million to shoot in the state in return for employing local workers.

Filming will largely take place in Detroit early next year.

The news comes six weeks after city officials filed the largest municipal bankruptcy case in U.S. history.

The producers hope to hire over Michigan workers, 500 local vendors and spend $5.1 million on hotels for cast and crew.

Snyder says, “Detroit is a great example of a quintessential American city, and I know it will make the perfect backdrop for our movie.”

The sequel will feature Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Laurence Fishburne and Diane Lane, while Ben Affleck was cast as Bruce Wayne/Batman last week.

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