News

Violin that played as Titanic sank sells for $1.5M

Violin that played as Titanic sank sells for $1.5M

PIECE OF HISTORY: The violin that belonged to Titanic bandmaster Wallace Hartley is seen on display at the Titanic Centre in Belfast in this Sept. 18 file photograph. Photo: Reuters/Cathal McNaughton

By Marie-Louise Gumuchian

LONDON (Reuters) – A violin that was being played as the Titanic went down was sold for $1.46 million at auction on Saturday, a record price for memorabilia from the doomed ocean liner.

Band leader Wallace Hartley played the instrument, trying to calm passengers as the ship slipped into the frozen waters of the North Atlantic in April 1912 after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York.

Hartley’s band played the hymn “Nearer, My God, To Thee” as passengers climbed into lifeboats. Hartley and his seven fellow band members all died after choosing to play on. More than 1,500 people died.

When Hartley’s body was recovered more than 10 days after the disaster, the violin was found in a leather case strapped to him, according to the folklore that has grown up around the event.

It was given back to Hartley’s fiancĂ©e Maria Robinson in England, and, after she died in 1939, it was donated to her local Salvation Army band and later passed on, eventually to the current owner, whose identity has not been disclosed.

A silver plate on the German-made violin is engraved “For WALLACE on the occasion of our ENGAGEMENT from MARIA”.

On sale with its case initialed W.H.H, the violin had a guide price of 300,000 pounds, Chrissie Aldridge, of auctioneers Henry Aldridge and Son, said.

“It is a record,” she told Reuters after the sale. Asked who had purchased the violin, she would only say: “A British collector.”

Rediscovered in 2006, it took specialists such as forensic science experts years to authenticate the instrument.

However some people still doubt whether the violin is genuine, believing it could not have survived being submerged in sea water.

The auction house said it had attracted interest from collectors all over the world. More than 300,000 people viewed it during a three-month exhibition in the United States.

Recent Headlines

in National

Ebola czar starts work, drugmakers launch vaccine drive

ebola

The Obama administration is ramping up its response to the potential spread of the virus.

in National, World

Canadian parliament attacked, soldier fatally shot

canadashooting

A gunman shot a soldier and then entered the country's parliament buildings, with at least 30 shots fired in dramatic scenes in the heart of the Canadian capital.

in Local

Florence Mother Not Happy With Police Gun Training Schedule

Photo courtesy of Daily Hampshire Gazette

A Florence woman isn't happy that the Northampton police department's officer firearms training will happen during school hours next week

in Local

Montague Road to Re-Open

road closed

A long-closed Montague road will reopen, despite the protests of some residents who believe it is unsafe

in Local

Subway Opens In Northampton

sub sandwich

A brand-new Subway sandwich shop is up and running in downtown Northampton